Where the Red-Winged Blackbird Sings

She could be sweet, she could be cruel, she sure played me for a fool.
She ran hot and she ran cold, and to her I sold my soul.

We stood there in the moonlight, and I held her oh so tight.
Still she’d find a way to do me wrong, while I strove to do her right.

Chorus:
Well my wife done gone and left me, where the red-winged blackbird sings.
Yah, my wife done gone and left me, wish I had my own [pair of wings]x2.


My heart was filled with hopes and dreams, of the treasures we would find.
But her smile was just a show put on, she had other things on her mind.

I toiled in the dust of a silver mine, in the Comstock of my soul.
And I prayed that I might find a way, to help our love be remade whole.

Chorus:
Well my wife done gone and left me, where the red-winged blackbird sings.
Yah, my wife done gone and left me, wish I had my own [pair of wings]x2.


But her heart flew off with another man, and there she made her nest.
I came to see I’d married an illusion, in her absence I was blessed.

It was wrong of me to suppose, that she could make me whole.
For we never really find our mate, unless it be our waiting soul.

Chorus:
Well, my wife done gone and left me where the red-winged blackbird sings.
Yah, my wife done gone and left me, and now I thank her for my wings.
[Yes, I thank her for my wings.]x4

[lyrics by Andy Drymalski, Ed.D.; everything else by Luke Drymalski]

Author’s note: We often project our soul onto our lover. This draws us to them, makes them irresistible. But this projection is also a burden for the other person because we put them too high on a pedestal and unconsciously impose expectations they cannot fulfill. Neither are they meant to. The magic of being in love can make us feel whole for awhile (as in the “you complete me” mentality), but ultimately our projections must be withdrawn.

Only a living relationship with your own soul—your deepest self—can make you whole in a truly authentic and stable way. This does not mean that you will lose your love for that other person, but that your love will become more grounded, reality-based, and less contaminated with projections and unreasonable expectations. You may even learn to love yourself more, because in withdrawing your projections you begin to see and develop in yourself what you once only saw in the other.

[This song evolved from the lyrics “My wife done gone and left me where the red-winged blackbird sings” which my unconscious for some reason put in my head. I guess the song just wanted to be written and I seemed like a reasonable enough guy to do it. I thought it might become a blues song, but I the song and my son apparently had other ideas. :-)]

Copyright © Andy Drymalski, Ed.D.
Excerpts may be used provided full and clear credit is given author with link to original article.

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